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10 Most Incredible Crater Lakes on Earth

24 December 2012 One Comment

The world is like a beautiful bride with a bundle of surprises. The planet hides some of the most amazing natural wonders in her heart like crater lakes. These lakes are so connected to the inner regions of the Earth that they contract expand, appear and vanish all within a split of a second. Though very few such lakes exist, they offer spectacular views for our eyes.

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Lake Atitlán

Dubbed as one of the most beautiful and picturesque lakes on the planet, Lake Atitlan in Guatemala is the deepest in Central America, going down to 340 meters at some points. The enormous caldera that is home to Lake Atitlan was formed 84,000 years ago due to volcanic activity, and the region is still known as a hotbed for volcanoes.

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Lake Taupo

Lake Taupo is arguably the most famous Crater Lake on the planet with a perimeter of 193 kilometres  a deepest point of 186 meters and a surface area of 616 square kilometres  It is the largest freshwater lake in Australasia and attracts over 1.5 million tourists each year with its vast magnificence, breathtaking sights and the sheer joy of basking in its calm tranquillity.

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Lake Nyos

Lake Nyos proves that a crater lake can be a carrier of death and dark poisonous clouds. Located in Cameroon, it sits majestically on top of an inactive volcano. The lake can omit carbon dioxide, due to its constantly being emitted by the volcanic vents under its lake bed. It was in 1986 that the lake suddenly spit out 1.6 million tons of CO2 into the air, killing over 1700 people and 3500 livestock in the nearby villages.

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Ojos del Salado Lake

Ojos del Salado Lake is the world’s highest lake, irrespective of size and magnitude, which stands 6,390 meters high.

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Lake Vico

Lake Vico has a timeless charm, exquisite beauty and is a perfect tourist destination due to its romantic setting. Located in Lazio, Central Italy, it is the highest of all the major Italian lakes with an altitude of 510 meters.

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Mount Katmai

The lake sits majestically in the caldera of Mount Katmai in Alaska. It was in June of 1912 that the peak of Mount Katmai imploded to create the large crater that today houses a lake more than 800 feet deep.

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Rano Kau

The name of Rano Kau might not sound that familiar but the name of Easter Island and its mysterious large stone statues are known across the world. It is on the edge of the crater wall in Rano Kau that one can find this ceremonial land of the ancient tribes that erected the giant statues.

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Crater Lake

Crater Lake in Oregon, USA is the second deepest lake in North America and the ninth deepest on the planet with an average depth of 350 meters and a deepest point of 594 meters beneath the surface. Formed after the collapse of Mount Mazama, the mineral-rich deep blue water of the lake along with its extraordinary clarity will make a great picturesque place.

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Blue Lake

Blue Lake in South Australia can change its color magically from season to season. With an average depth of 72 to 75 meters and stretching across an area of 1087 meters by 657 meters, the lake took shape after a volcanic explosion near Mount Gambier. The lake appears in a vivid copper blue in summer months, while in winter it turns into dull grey with astonishing ease.

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Lake Toba

Located in the heart of the Indonesian island of Sumatra and stretching across a vast 1,130 square kilometres  Lake Toba is the largest crater lake on the planet by a long way.

One Comment »

  • Caroline Clark said:

    Your photo of crater lake is not crater lake.
    Crater lake is surrounded by a rugged caldera, and has an island.

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