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[12 Sep 2009 | No Comment | ]
Taizo to lead the elderly in Physical Exercise

Technology.am (Sept. 12, 2009) — Researchers at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) unveiled a new humanoid robot called Taizo, which is designed to lead the elderly in physical exercises.
The 28-inch tall robot weighs 14 pounds and is designed to motivate elderly people to engage in more physical exercise.
Taizo’s head, hands, and feet are made of fiberglass reinforced plastic.
Its body has 26 joints so it can smoothly march 30 different moves while sitting in chair. It can also stand up to do …

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[12 Sep 2009 | No Comment | ]
Finally, the IEEE approved 802.11n Wi-Fi standard

Technology.am (Sept. 12, 2009) — The IEEE has finally approved the 802.11n high-throughput wireless LAN standard.
The new wireless networking standard provides improved data rates and ranges for wireless local area networks (WLANs) and is capable of delivering throughput speeds up to 300 megabits per second (and even higher).
This new amendment to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) 802.11 Wi-Fi provides the very best connection available for computer networking and home entertainment applications alike – delivering the range, bandwidth, and performance today’s multimedia applications and …

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[11 Sep 2009 | No Comment | ]
New Software Tool to Help The Blind Navigate Through Unfamiliar Places

Technology.am (Sept. 11, 2009) — Dr. Orly Lahav of Tel Aviv University’s School of Education and Porter School for Environmental Studies has invented a new software tool to help the blind navigate through unfamiliar places.
Dr. Lahav’s software takes physical information from our world and digitizes it for transfer to a computer, with which the user interacts using a joystick, a 3-D haptic device.
People can feel tension beneath their fingertips as a physical sensation through the joystick as they navigate around a virtual environment which they cannot …

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[11 Sep 2009 | No Comment | ]
MU engineers develop safer, Blast-Resistant Glass

Technology.am (Sept. 11, 2009) — University of Missouri researchers are developing and testing a new type of blast-resistant glass that will be thinner, lighter and less vulnerable to small-scale explosions.
“Currently, blast-resistant window glass is more than 1 inch thick, whereas the standard window glass is one-fourth of an inch thick and hurricane-protected window glass is one-half of an inch thick,” said Sanjeev Khanna, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering in the MU College of Engineering.
“The glass we are developing is less than one-half of an …

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[11 Sep 2009 | No Comment | ]
World’s Smallest Neurostimulator gets CE Mark Approvals

Technology.am (Sept. 11, 2009) — St. Jude Medical, Inc. announced CE (Conformité Européenne) Mark approval of the Brio ™ neurostimulator, the world’s smallest, longest-lasting rechargeable deep brain stimulation (DBS) device for treating the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Its battery is supposed to survive a decade of recharging.
Slightly larger than the typical man’s watch, the Brio neurostimulator has a thin 10 mm thick and weighs just 1 ounce (29 grams).
A 67-year-old man who has suffered from Parkinson’s disease for more than 26 years became the first person …

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[9 Sep 2009 | No Comment | ]
High in Sodium: Highly Charged Tungsten Ions May Diagnose Fusion Energy Reactors

Technology.am (Sept. 09, 2009) — Sodium-like tungsten ions (blue) are far smaller than neutral sodium atoms (orange)—the ion’s 11 electrons are pulled in very tightly by the 74 protons in the tungsten nucleus, making their energy jumps far more expensive than in neutral sodium and causing them to emit high-energy ultraviolet wavelengths of light, rather than visible light, as is the case with ordinary sodium.
Just as health-food manufacturers work on developing the best possible sodium substitutes for low-salt diets, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology …

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[9 Sep 2009 | No Comment | ]
Bacteria to convert Radioactive Metals to Inert Substances

Technology.am (Sept. 09, 2009) — Judy Wall, at the University of Missouri, is working with bacteria that convert toxic radioactive metal to inert substances. These findings could be beneficial to heavy metal pollution from storage tanks and industrial waste.
She uses the sulfate-reducing bacteria to convert toxic radioactive metal to inert substances, a much more economical solution.
The bacteria are bio-corrosives and can change the solubility of heavy metals. They can take uranium and convert it to uraninite, a nearly insoluble substance that will sink to the bottom …

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[9 Sep 2009 | No Comment | ]
New way to listen Earth’s stretching, cracking from number of locations

Technology.am (Sept. 09, 2009) — University of Edinburgh scientists have developed a new technique to monitor movements beneath the Earth’s surface.
Scientists currently monitor underground movements, such as earthquakes and nuclear tests, using seismometers. The new method, which uses data collected from earthquakes, potentially allows the Earth’s seismic activity to be mapped more comprehensively.
The instruments measure the motion of those events at the Earth’s surface, helping to indicate where they took place.
Now scientists have analysed the seismic waves from two different earthquakes. By doing so, it has …

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[9 Sep 2009 | No Comment | ]
Multiple Origin Spatio-Temporal Modeling of EEG

Technology.am (Sept. 09, 2009) — University of Victoria researcher Phil Zeman has developed a new and less expensive procedure for analyzing electroencephalogram (EEG) data that identifies the location of special brain activities.
Traditionally, it is functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) that is used to identify which areas of the brain are active during different mental states.
Zeman’s technology is an inexpensive alternative to fMRI—$100,000 versus several million dollars. It also requires little maintenance and can be used in an ordinary laboratory or office.
The EEG analysis tool is …